Domestic Violence Can Lead to Insomnia

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Insomnia | Best-Cure-for-Insomnia.comThere’s no question that stress is one of the biggest contributors to insomnia. However, there are many factors that can contribute to an experience of insomnia. Medication, physical illness, or simply drinking too much caffeine during the day can lead to not being able to sleep. Yet, for many, insomnia can be the result of anxiety, depression, and in general a very active mind.

Of course, the mind becomes more and more active when there is psychological and physical threats and danger, and this is often true for both partners involved in domestic violence. Both the aggressor and the victim can experience the violence between them as traumatic. An experience that is considered traumatic is one that threatens the injury, death, or physical integrity, and is usually accompanied by terror and helplessness. A traumatic event could be the death of a friend or family member, sexual or physical abuse, an automobile accident, school violence, experiences of war, the effects of natural disasters, and acts of terrorism. It can include many types of violent experiences, including domestic violence. As a result of experiencing such an intense ordeal, along with feeling powerless to do anything about it, psychological symptoms often result, one of which is insomnia. Continue reading

Sleep: Sometimes It’s Simply How You Look At It

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Insomnia | Best-Cure-for-Insomnia.comMost people who don’t get enough sleep are usually irritable, grumpy, or even angry throughout the day. And in fact, without enough sleep, mental and physical ability change getting worse and worse with the longer an individual has been awake. After 17 hours of no sleep, cognitive ability drops to a point that is similar to having a blood alcohol level of .05 (characterized by impaired judgment and coordination). After 24 hours of no sleep, it’s practically like being legally drunk. Over time a chronic lack of shut-eye makes you more prone to accidents, depression, and anxiety.

However, more and more experts are recognizing what’s called “short sleepers”, people who don’t need more than four or five hours per night. Most people need between 7 and 9 hours to feel rested and rejuvenated throughout the day. True “short sleepers” are rare, according to sleep specialist Carol Ash, DO, a member of the Ladies Home Journal Medical Advisory Board. “Only a tiny percentage of people can function well with that little [sleep],” she says. Continue reading