Eight Tips for A Good Night’s Sleep from Harvard Medical School – Part Two

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This is the second article in a two part series that lists eight techniques for getting a good night’s sleep. The list was put together by Harvard Medical School after research and study on what can affect a person’s ability to sleep. This article will share the last four of the eight techniques.

5. Eat—But Don’t Eat a Large Meal Before Bed

Eat | Best-Cure-For-Insomnia.comWhen you’re hungry and when you’ve eaten too much, your body might be unable to sleep. Both situations can be distractions. Ideally, avoid eating a big meal within two to three hours of bedtime. And to avoid being hungry at bedtime, eat a light snack about an hour or two before bed, such as an apple with a slice of cheese or a few whole-wheat crackers. Continue reading

The Pains and Pleasures of Insomnia

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Insomnia | Best-Cure-For-Insomnia.comIt’s not easy when you can’t sleep. You’re tired during the day. You’re feeling irritable and easily frustrated because the fatigue is starting to get to you. You know that not being able to sleep at night is getting in the way of your work performance from time to time. It’s getting in the way of your family life too by having to take naps when you could be spending time with your children.

Insomnia might also be challenging because you can’t ever get on a sleep schedule that works for you. You sleep a few hours at night, not enough to feel rested, and then a nap whenever you can fit it in during the day. Together, the two leave you feeling very tired and perhaps even anxious. Continue reading

What To Tell Your Doctor About Your Sleep Patterns

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Insomnia | Best-Cure-For-Insomnia.comWhen you’re having trouble sleeping, you might want to bring it to your doctor. You might want to get more information about what might be preventing your ability to sleep. And most importantly, you likely want to find solutions so that you can go back to getting a full night’s sleep.

Doctors will use a wide variety of tools to diagnose and measure insomnia symptoms. If you’ve gone to your doctor’s office to talk about your sleep patterns, your doctor will likely have you complete a questionnaire, perform blood tests, have you do an overnight sleep study, and have you fill out a sleep log. The following tools are what your doctor might use to get details on the patterns of your sleep: Continue reading

Neutralize Your Anxiety When You Can’t Sleep

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If you’re experiencing insomnia and your getting anxious about it, the whole situation can become a vicious cycle. You try to go to sleep but you can’t, so you start to worry about the fatigue you’re going to feel tomorrow. You start to worry about not being able to fall asleep. But the more you worry, the more you can’t sleep, and the more you can’t sleep, the more you worry.

So, one thing to do is to neutralize the anxiety before you go to bed. But first let’s explore what insomnia is.  Insomnia is a sleep disorder. It’s the experience of either not being able to fall asleep or it’s an inability to stay asleep as long as you would like. For instance, you might fall asleep and then wake up at 4am every morning. You might not be able to get a healthy 8 or 9 hours of sleep. Continue reading

The Physical and Mental Illnesses Associated With Insomnia

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Insomnia | Best-Cure-for-Insomnia.comSleep is a vital component of good health. Not getting enough sleep can lead to disease and illness, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and depression. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) points out that the lack of sleep actually contributes to the onset of these illnesses, not just that they contribute to ill health once a person has a disease.

The medical community recognizes that there are two forms of insomnia. Primary insomnia is when a person is having sleep problems that are not directly associated with any other health condition or problem. Secondary insomnia means that a person is having sleep problems because of something else, such as asthma, depression, anxiety, arthritis, cancer, pain in the body, or substance abuse. Lack of sleep might also happen because of necessary medication for another illness.

The following will explore the diseases mentioned here in order to shed light on the physical and mental illnesses associated with insomnia. Continue reading